The “Real” Value of Learning New Survival Skills | Escape The Woods

Blog

4August2015

The “Real” Value of Learning New Survival Skills

Let’s just admit what we all know: The odds of a natural or unnatural apocalypse happening this week where you live are about as high as the federal deficit dropping to zero by the end of this year. Possible. But not likely. So why on earth would any sane person spend time preparing for “the worst case scenario”?

Your answer may be different but here is mine:

I don’t like safety nets provided by other people.   They make me feel weak. If you need to borrow food from a neighbor, you should do so. But if possible, you should be the neighbor who provides the food.  If you need to be on unemployment until you find a job, you should do so. Don’t get me wrong. A good and moral society needs safety nets. A good country takes care of those who cannot take care of themselves. But that is not how I plan my life. A wise person once said: “God helps those who have exhausted all of their resources and never before”. That’s scary and comforting all at the same time. Scary because I rarely have exhausted all of my resources. Comforting because I have been at the “end of my rope” and yet found a solution that had nothing to do with “my” resources.

C.S. Lewis said: “ A ship is safe in the harbor, but a ship was not designed for life in the harbor” I can’t speak for you, but here is what I know about me. I like to feel safe but I know I wasn’t designed to live life in the harbor. I am alive when I am at sea. When I am away from the shore I learn about what I am made of. When I travel farther away from the harbor toward the unknown, my mind and body is expanded toward what else I can accomplish, who I can help, where else I can go and what more I can learn. When I stay in the harbor, I am looking at my neighbor’s boat. How much bigger it is than mine. I worry about my anchor rusting and whether or not it needs painted. But not when I am at sea. At sea, I am looking to the horizon. I am living in the moment. I am preparing for the future. Every time I expand my ability or my knowledge, I am venturing a little further “out to sea”. My job is to make myself a better person….never to judge my neighbors boat….and definitely not to rely upon my neighbor’s boat simply because I have not kept mine seaworthy.

To be certain, most people never “need” to be able to run 26 miles without stopping. That is not why people train for a marathon. Few people will ever need to be able to lift 250 pounds straight above their heads, but that is not why people lift weights. And I may never be in a situation where I need to prevent my children, or myself from dying of hypothermia by building a temporary shelter. But that is not why I learn survival skills. I learn survival skills because I want to head out to sea. I have seen the view from the harbor. It’s a nice place to visit but I wouldn’t want to live there.

If this makes sense to you, I hope to see you at one of our events….but if not….I know our ships will pass elsewhere on the open sea!

Safe travels,

Todd.

Captain of the ship here at Escape the Woods.

5 COMMENTS to "The “Real” Value of Learning New Survival Skills"

  1. Reply Tina Bryant August 22, 2015 at 12:53 am

    Would love to do the challenge! I just can’t afford to y there and expenses right now. If you bring program closer to South, I’d love to try! I do have some skills because of training for women from Dept of Conservation in AL, and this is right up my alley! Love the show, wish you’d do one for women!!! I’d for sure do it!!! Tina Bryant

  2. Reply Jan Shepherd Palmer August 22, 2015 at 11:16 am

    I don’t know how to think any other way!! My being female makes survival all the more difficult, – Im not only trying to survive on daily basis but I have to compete with males regularly, – “Im Tom-Boy” to the hilt & have been since 7 yrs. old !!! Ive even swam with the sharks while surfing at 7 & 8 yrs. old & “hanging 10” !!!!!

  3. Reply Mark Marshall September 10, 2015 at 2:14 pm

    A ship is safe in the harbor? Usually, yes, but I know of 1100 men who discovered otherwise aboard USS Arizona on December 7th, 1941 and saw USS White Plains severely damaged and lifted out of the water onto the rocks by a typhoon while in port because she could not get underway!

  4. Reply Brian September 19, 2015 at 12:04 am

    As a novice sailor and fan of CS Lewis (favorite author) loved the analogy.
    I think a dad and son survivor trip would be an awesome experience for a birthday gift for my 17 year old this winter. any suggestions.

  5. Reply Jackie Eastom September 22, 2015 at 8:41 pm

    I like your program,find your stories interesting.

Leave Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *